Why My Kid is an iKid

Sophia got her first introduction to the iPad at about 3 months old.

As soon as she could sit in a rocker chair my wife and I let her start playing on the iPad. 

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We started off with just one game, Interactive Alphabet by Piikea.  It is basically a game that goes through the Alphabet and lets the baby interact with some of the pictures.

We added a few more ABC type of games as she got a bit older, but we mainly just let her play with that one game, because we figured it would be great to let her start seeing letters and learning the alphabet as early as possible.

Right from the get-go she would swat at the screen.  She didn’t immediately understand the cause and effect, but she quickly grasped the idea that when she hit the screen, something would happen.

After a while she became pretty good at being able to do the simple things in the ABC game.  She would still swat the screen, but purposefully swat certain areas in order to do something like build a sandcastle.

Around 12 months, we started adding a bunch more apps.  We added some interactive books and a couple of simple games.

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Sophia was learning how to do many more things in the apps.  She could point with a couple of fingers and very purposefully touch certain areas of the screen. 

She really didn’t have any concept of touching and dragging though, and would often run into problems of having one hand leaning on the iPad which was causing the other hand’s touches not to register.

She’s now 18 months and she is an iPad master.

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Sophia can now:

  • Turn on the iPad
  • Unlock the iPad
  • Pick which app she wants to play out of her folders
  • Use the home button to exit an app
  • Double press the home button to switch to a recent app
  • Navigate through menus in apps and get back to the app
  • Use the table of contents in books to pick the page she wants

She also asks for the iPad by name.  She has about 40 apps on the iPad that she subsumed from my wife.  It seems like she is learning something new every day now.

The world is changing

Our children, especially the youngest ones, are growing up in an entirely different world than has existed ever before.

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I know this has been said many times before and it could be argued that my generation also grew up in an entirely different world than my parents, but I think the change we are seeing now is much more substantial.

I predict that this generation will be known as the tablet generation.  With Windows 8 now released we are going to see a rapid decline of non-touch devices.  In a few years all laptops will be touch screen retina displays.

There are some fundamental changes going on in how we interact with computers and even what defines a computer.

Yes, I know you’ve heard all this before, but why is this important?

It is important because the real shift I see is the shift between a primarily analog focused world view to a primarily digital focused world view.

For me the iPad or the computer is an attempt to replicate some process or experience in the real world.  No matter how long I work with computers or use these devices, I cannot escape my world view.  Analog always comes first.

For our children things are different.

I can’t say for sure that picking up a pencil and being able to write is a skill that will even be necessary.

It is very likely that this coming generation will view things through the digital lens first and the analog world will be secondary.

I don’t mean they’ll be jacked into computer all day and live in a virtual world, but I do think that while we try to relate software to tangible things the coming generation is likely to view software as the primary and tangible objects as secondary.

Think about music.  Ever had an 8Track?  How about a cassette tape? CD anyone?

How do we think of music today?  One word comes to mind—MP3.

What started out as a physical record eventually lost its purpose and is now so heavily digital that we tend to think in terms of the digital and don’t even consider the tangible anymore.

The same thing is currently happening with books, movies and to some degree money.

Why we let Sophia be an iKid

With the changing world, computer literacy is more important than ever before.

Even in the world we live in now, it is just about impossible to get any kind of non-labor intensive job without being able to use a computer.

If computer literacy is arguably going to be the most important skill for anyone to have in the future, why not start as young as they start to show an interest?

I think it is a huge asset to develop in our children the ability to use a computer as easily and mindlessly as the ability to eat with a fork and a spoon.

I wish I had that ability. I could be so much more efficient if I would stop writing down lists on pieces of paper and instead pull up my iPad or other tablet to jot down ideas and completely replace paper in my life.

And sure I could learn to wean myself off of the analog world, but I want my daughter to be able to think first in the digital world.  She’ll be way more efficient and see things from a better perspective than I ever will.

Aside from that, my wife and I find that the iPad is an excellent learning tool to help Sophia learn to learn.

There are so many things she is able to teach herself using that iPad.

She already:

  • Has a vocabulary of over 100 words
  • Can count to 4 in order and count actual objects
  • Can say most of her ABCs
  • Can recognize most letters
  • Can name many animals and objects

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Much of what she knows she learned at her own pace based on what she was interested in playing on the iPad.

For example, one week she’ll be playing many of the numbers apps.  For a whole month she just wanted to do alphabets.

The iPad gives her the freedom to be able to choose what she wants to learn and to do it effortlessly.  She is developing the skills to be able to self-educate.  Sure, we still read books to her and try to teach her, but she seems to get a large amount of her knowledge from what she learns playing on the iPad.  (At least the reinforcement of what she has learned.)

Overall I don’t think there is any reason to stop her from playing on the iPad.  I know some people equate it to TV, but I think it is fundamentally different.  The apps she plays on the iPad are interactive.  You can’t mindlessly sit and watch the iPad.  Instead, there is a constant feedback loop that is not present with TV.

Also we can carefully monitor the apps she uses.  The TV is an open system that brings unknown content into your house, where the iPad can be used as more of a closed system.

To summarize, I think we are preparing her for the future and giving her a huge head start in life.

How to get started

So you may be wondering how to best go about getting your baby or toddler started with the iPad.

While I’m not a child development expert, I can give you some advice from what my wife and I have learned in this process.

I’d start by picking up a used first generation iPad and a good case.

You can of course get a newer iPad or even another tablet, or the iPad mini, but just be aware of two things.

  1. Babies don’t have very precise coordination with their hands so small screen are going to be hard for them to use.
  2. Babies tend to throw things, especially when they get frustrated.

The next thing you need is apps.  My wife, Heather, wrote up this section for me.  So, if you notice the grammar is perfect and is written with a much higher skill level than my usual writing, that is why.

(Please let me know if you have some other ones appropriate for the ages.  I’d like to make a nice resource for other iKid believers.)

3 Months – 12 Months

  • Interactive Alphabet by Piikea.  This is by far the best app I’ve seen for the youngest of kids. It has a baby mode which prevents babies from exiting by accidentally batting a menu button and most of the items respond to simple taps or swipes.
  • Juno’s Musical ABCs by Juno Baby.  This app also goes through the alphabet but with a musical theme. The interactions aren’t as neat as the Piikea app and the button to return to the menu is prominent and easily pressed.
  • Peekaboo Baby. This is my app.  Warning, it is very simple.  I was learning MonoTouch and wrote it in a day as an experiment.

12 Months to 18 Months

  • Seuss ABC, Green Eggs These stories have autoplay, read to me, or self-reading features and will say the word of anything the child touches on the screen. There is actually an entire line of the Dr. Seuss books, but I prefer these two. The ABC app is great because each letter is said multiple times. The Green Eggs app is my daughter’s favorite, and I suspect this is because so many of the words in this story (eggs, boat, house, mouse, car, train, etc.) are ones most 18 month olds know. These books are a little long so if you’re more interested in the stories, go with the Bright and Early Board Books instead of these apps. The Mercer Mayer, Little Critter books are also available and tend to be shorter in length.
  • I Hear Ewe This neat little app has three screens of picture tiles: two of animals, one of vehicles. When touched it says: "this is the sound a [insert animal or vehicle here] makes:" I like this because it doesn’t require page navigation. A child can sit and do this for a short period and when they get bored, you can switch the screen for them. Sophia plays this occasionally at 18 months but it doesn’t hold her interest as much, so I suggest trying it at a little younger age.
  • Pat the Bunny by Random House. There is both a paint and interactive option with this app. The paint seems to always crash, most likely due to the mad tapping of a toddler, so I avoid it. The read option has a bunch of items on the screen that kids can interact with (turn off a light, put shave gel on daddy’s face, wave bye bye, play peek a boo, etc.) I’ve never seen the real book, but I wouldn’t be surprised if this app is better than the book. Changing screens is manual and may require adult help. There is an obnoxious Easter egg on every page that brings up the bunny.
  • Princess Baby by Random House. I was actually disappointed there wasn’t more to this app, but Sophia has played it enough that it makes the list. It begins by having you “Choose your favorite princess.” Each princess has 3 toys that can be interacted with in a very limited way: wand, drum, ball, flower, blocks, cat. The princess can be put to bed, which Sophia likes doing over and over and over again.

18 Months +

  • A Monster at the end of this book.  Starring your lovable, furry pal Grover from Sesame Street, this app has a very cute storyline. In order to advance through the book certain tasks, such as touching knots to untie the page or knocking down bricks must be performed. This is another one where the app may be better than the book itself. One bonus: the pages are locked when Grover is talking, which keeps an eager toddler from advancing through too quickly. My daughter loved this book earlier on but I had to help her with some of the action pages and it was just recently that she started doing it all on her own.
  • Another Monster at the end of this book.  Starring Grover and Elmo, some of the tasks are a little trickier than the first book (matching colors, wiping away glue), but did I mention it has Elmo?
  • Little Fox by GoodBeans. This is one of my favorite apps. It has 3 different songs to choose from and each has its own scene: London Bridge is Falling Down, Old MacDonald, and The Evening Song. Each scene is cleverly interactive and entertaining. Old Mac Donald has 4 seasons to select from and the interactions change based on the season. There is also a little "fox studio" with a ton of interactive objects used to make music.
  • Nighty Night by GoodBeans.  Adorable. The animals at the farm house need to go to sleep. This is done by clicking on the area each animal resides in and turning off the light. The animals respond to touch. Additional animals can be purchased (2 sets of 3 animals each).
  • Itsy Bitsy Spider by Duck Duck Moose.  Another fantastic app, this may be the one Sophia has clocked the most time with. In order to progress through this app, you must click on the spider. Each time the spider is touched one line of the song is sung and the spider moves. There is a lot to interact with at each spot and one the second time through the song there are decorated eggs the child can collect on the spider’s back. There is a cute little narrator fly that teaches the child about items the child clicks on (i.e clouds, the sun, rainbows).
  • Ewe Can Count.  This is a cute counting game where you count a random number of sheep, horses, apples, etc. There is a learning and a quiz mode.
  • Logic Lite.  This app is great because it teaches the complicated click and drag gesture. The full version has three additional tile sets: Numbers – match dots to the written number, Pictures – match a picture that contains a shape to the shape it contains, and Letters. The letters are great at 18 months, but the other two are too complex.

Your mileage may vary

Having your little one use an iPad might not work out as well as it has for us, so I think it is only fair to disclose some of the circumstances which govern our life that may help to make our experience successful.

  1. My wife is a stay at home mom.  She used to be a techie, but left the digital world to raise our daughter.  I only bring this up, because she interacts with Sophia all day.  If we were putting Sophia in day care, I would be more hesitant to give her the iPad during our interactive time with her.  (But I would probably try to get the day care to let her use it.)
  2. We have almost 0 TV in our house.  I don’t watch any TV at all or movies.  My wife very rarely watches TV and Sophia never does.  I think this is important, because if she were watching TV, I would also be a bit more hesitant to let her play with the iPad as much.
  3. We do LOTS of other activities.  Just about every day of the week she has either swimming, gym class, play date, or something else going on.  My point here is that she gets plenty of outside time, social interaction and physical activity.
  4. Sophia took the to the iPad right away.  We didn’t have to force it on her or even encourage her to use it.  I don’t know if other kids are like this or not, although I suspect most would be.

So doing the same thing my wife and I are doing might not be the best for you family—you’ll have to decide for yourself—but as far as our daughter has been concerned the experience has been overall positive and beneficial.

  • Evan Terry

    I usually agree with your posts but what you are doing goes directly against the latest research on the effect of screen time on child brain development, not to mention the potential for issues related to behavioral development and interpersonal communication.

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no screen time for children under the age of 2 (http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/19/health/19babies.html). While they admit there is no direct observable connection between developmental problems and screen time, why take the risk?

    Also, there is a growing sense among child development experts that there may be a screen-to-ADHD connection: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/10/health/views/10klass.html.

    You’re clearly free to do what you feel is right in raising your child, but I think it bears mention that the actions you are taking are far from risk-free.

    • http://simpleprogrammer.com jsonmez

      Good points. Thanks for bringing that up. Certainly that is a point that I did neglect to mention in my post and it does deserve to be mentioned.

      I thought about addressing those particular articles in my post, but had decided not to since I wanted to focus on the positives rather than defending the negatives.

      I read those same articles and came across them again while researching this post, but I’ve found that there is not a study that differentiates between different categories of screen time.

      Of course this is no fault of the American Academy of Pediatrics, since there is no way they could have enough data to produce a study on the results of iPad or tablet time for toddlers and babies.

      But, although I could be wrong, my current line of thinking is that there is a great deal of difference between learning games on an iPad vs sitting in front of a TV.

      I am one of the biggest believers in the ills of TV watching that I know. I don’t watch TV ever, nor do I allow my daughter to. I firmly believe it just wastes our time and that TV is responsible for the waste of what otherwise could be productive lives. Also that it is an addiction that most of the US suffers from.

      I only say this to show how differ I view the iPad and other interactive media than TV.

      Like I said, I could be wrong, but because the studies are focused on TV and I see TV so different than iPad use, and because of the positive results I have seen in my own daughter, I am confident enough to share my experience and even recommend it (provided I disclose what I did in the “Your Mileage May Vary” section.

      After reading the studies, I just could not see how the arbitrary assignment of results to “screens” makes sense. How really is an iPad that much different than a pop-up book? Is it because it has a screen that makes it have ill effects? My answer is that at the time of the study it didn’t make sense to differentiate different types of screens, because the only screen kids would be watching would be a TV screen.

      So, I consider there to be a total absence of information regarding iPad usage by toddlers and in the absence of information, I fall back on my own judgement, experience and intuition.

      But, I do thank you for bringing up this topic, because reflecting back now on my post, I see that it was not balanced, because I did not address the other side of the story as any good debate or responsible journalism should. And though my blog is far from having journalistic weight, it is still a basic and responsible thing to present a viewpoint fairly by expressing both sides.

      So thanks :) And a handshake over the miles to you.

  • tools

    Hello iDad

    I think two of the key findings from the AAP report which are screen-type independent are worth mentioning here:
    * Unstructured play time is more valuable for the developing brain than electronic media. Children learn to think creatively, problem solve, and develop reasoning and motor skills at early ages through unstructured, unplugged play. Free play also teaches them how to entertain themselves.
    * Young children learn best from – and need – interaction with humans, not screens.

    http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/Pages/Babies-and-Toddlers-Should-Learn-from-Play-Not-Screens.aspx

    In what ways do you feel that our children will benefit more in seeing the world primarily through a digital lens?

    Will our health (both physical and physiological) benefit from it?

    Will our relationships benefit from it?

    Will our natural environment benefit from it?

    My intuition is that seeing things primarily through screens will alienate us from our real world, each other and ourselves.

    — There is more to life than increasing its speed (Ghandi)

    • http://simpleprogrammer.com jsonmez

      I think your first two points are definitely correct. We try to make sure our daughter has plenty of unstructured play time and interaction with us. The iPad is really just a supplement.

      I do think that seeing the world through a digital lens will be an asset in the coming future. It is just important to not lose sight of relationships and other aspects that make us human.

  • tools

    Thank you for your reply. I forgot to thank you for sharing a personal story and experience on your blog.

    I agree that computer literacy is an asset (“value … that can be converted into cash” – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asset).

    I don’t agree that it is “the most import skill” to have, even when accounting for the different definitions of “computer literacy”. I will never rank “computer literacy” above these skills:
    1. Empathy
    2. Creativity
    3. Critical thinking

    It’s hard for me to think that today’s children will grow up without some degree “computer literacy”, even if parents don’t encourage use of computers. In my opinion, you’d have to work pretty hard to make someone growing up today computer illiterate (again, depends on your definition, I’d like to know yours).

    I will struggle for as long as I can to give my child’s attention over to a company that claims their screen is “… a magical window where nothing comes between you and what you love.”

    Some humour: http://dilbert.com/strips/comic/1991-12-14/

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