Tag Archives: productivity

The Caffeinated Coder: Is Caffeine Good or Bad?

For a long time I’ve wondered about the benefits or detriments of caffeine. I’ve always been one of those coffee drinkers who didn’t have to have coffee, but drank it when it was available.

I’ve never really noticed how caffeine affected me, because I never really paid that much attention.

But, I’ve always been curious, especially as a software developer, whether or not caffeine had an overall positive or negative effect.

For the purposes of this post, I’ll equate drinking caffeine with drinking coffee, since most of the studies are done on coffee and not caffeine specifically, and most of my caffeine intake comes from coffee.

coffee The Caffeinated Coder: Is Caffeine Good or Bad?

Anyway, about 4 months ago or so, I stopped drinking coffee completely. I tried to cut out pretty much all caffeine. About a month or so again, I started drinking coffee again. In fact, I am sitting in a coffee shop here in Maui drinking some coffee as I type this post.

Quitting coffee

When I first stopped drinking coffee I didn’t really notice any withdrawal effects. Some people report massive headaches and nausea, but I didn’t notice anything really. Perhaps just a bit more sleeping. Now, that might have been because I never was a big coffee drinker. I would usually have 1 or 2 cups a day and a few diet cokes.

You might be wondering why I decided to quit caffeine in the first place. Mostly it came from the idea that I didn’t want to be dependent on any substance and I thought that the extra energy or boost I was getting from caffeine must have been coming at some cost. I wanted to see if I could achieve more even energy levels by avoiding caffeine completely. And really I was just curious to see if I would even notice the difference.

One of the first differences I did notice, after about a week, was that I did feel more level. In general, I felt like my energy levels were the same throughout the day, except for at night when I was a bit more tired than usual.

no coffee1 The Caffeinated Coder: Is Caffeine Good or Bad?

Being more level was what I was going for, so in a way that was good, but I also started to feel more depressed. At first I thought I was imagining it, but having been back on caffeine now for over a month, I am sure that being off caffeine was causing some amount of depression. I figured this mood change would lessen over time, but after about 3 months, it didn’t seem to change. I only started to see improvements in mood after I started drinking coffee again.

I also noticed that I started to feel less motivated. Now, this could have been somewhat of a coincidence, since I had just gone through a period of working very hard, but I suspect it was somewhat related to not having the caffeine.

Part of the reason for the lack of motivation might have been related to my difficulty in focusing. I did notice that without the caffeine, I was having a more difficult time sitting down and working for extended periods of time. I was much more likely to be distracted and start checking Facebook or doing something else, rather than staying on task.

Overall though, quitting caffeine didn’t really seem to have any positive benefits. I was expecting to feel better and have steady energy levels throughout the day. I was also expecting better sleep, but I really didn’t notice anything but negative effects.

Adding caffeine back

I finally decided to start drinking caffeine again. I’m not sure exactly why, but I think I got to the point where I realized that I wasn’t getting any notable positive benefits from quitting caffeine, so I was curious to see if I would now gain some positive benefits from adding it back.

I have to say that as soon as I started drinking coffee again, I began to notice an increase in overall happiness. My mood, in general, seemed to improve. I did not expect this at all, but after a few weeks, it was pretty apparent that adding caffeine back into my diet was the cause.

I also immediately noticed that my ability to focus increased. I found it much easier to sit down and write a blog post or work on something for several hours at a time without becoming distracted. Even now, as I am writing this post, I am finding it extremely easy to write without being tempted to do something else. The whole time I was not taking caffeine, I was struggling with sitting down for more than 30 minutes to work on something.

About the time I started taking caffeine again, I had decided to start doing some all-day fasts in order to drop some weight and to keep from gaining weight while I was on semi-vacation here in Maui. I had seen several studies that showed that caffeine, especially combined with Yohimbine, (which I am also taking,) had some positive effects on fat loss. I can’t completely confirm that this is the case, but I have lost significant fat during this time period and do feel like my appetite is suppressed to some degree.

Now, I don’t want to pretend that adding caffeine back was all good. There was at least one detrimental effect I noticed. Once I started drinking coffee again, I noticed that it was much more difficult to get good sleep. I noticed that even drinking decaf coffee in the evening seemed to cause me to have sleeping difficulties. Fortunately, those effects did seem to subside, especially when I started making sure to cut my caffeine consumption after noon each day. But, really that was the only detrimental effect I noticed.

What about the studies? What do they say about caffeine?

Obviously, everything I’ve talked about so far has been from my own observations, experimenting on myself, but there have been plenty of studies done on drinking coffee and consuming caffeine. So what do they say?

Well, most studies say that drinking coffee is good for you. I really couldn’t find anything that showed any conclusive evidence that caffeine was bad for you. There were a few studies that showed some possible negative effects–especially if you drank way too much–but, overall almost all the research points to positive effects for coffee and caffeine.

One of the most documented effects of caffeine is on energy levels–no surprise there. Caffeine has been shown to increase energy levels by basically suppressing adenosine in the brain. This has the effect of letting more of the brain’s stimulants do their work. So caffeine doesn’t actually give you energy, it just stops your brain from regulating it so much.

Studies have also shown a positive increase in brain function. Focus levels and memory seem to be improved by caffeine consumption and some studies have shown that it may help stave off diseases like Alzheimer’s and even Parkinson’s.

I talked about this a little before, but caffeine is in just about every fat burning pill out there. The reason is because studies have shown that it has appetite suppressing effects and can help increase metabolism. These effects have generally been shown to be pretty small though, so I wouldn’t give them that much weight.

Finally, and not so surprisingly, caffeine has been shown to ward off depression. I wouldn’t have believed this one if I hadn’t experienced it myself, but I’ve seen a couple of studies mentioning this effect.

There was some early research that pointed to coffee and caffeine causing heart disease and higher rates of cancer, but most of those studies were flawed because they failed to take into account that the more frequent coffee drinkers were also more likely to be smokers. In fact, many of the recent studies show that drinking coffee is likely to help you live longer.

If you want to read a good book on caffeine, check out: Buzz: The Science and Lore of Alcohol and Caffeine.

So should coders drink caffeine?

I’m sure you can guess what my opinion on this is. Overall, I think it is beneficial–but, in moderation.

Plenty of data suggests that drinking too much caffeine starts to decrease the effectiveness of it. If you drink 10 cups of coffee every day, your body will adapt to it and pretty soon you will stop getting the benefits of being more alert and focused.

It seems that you get the best benefit if you don’t let your body get too adapted to it and you time the caffeine intake with the times when you need extra focus and energy.

I would say that you can actually get extra work done with no real additional cost if you can consume caffeine at the right times. I always suspected that you paid for that extra energy somehow, but now I don’t think that is the case. So, yes, caffeine can actually help you be a better coder.

With that said, I would avoid drinking caffeine later in the day, because it definitely can disrupt your sleep. Caffeine usually has a half-life of about 6 hours, so it is probably best to steer clear of it in the afternoon, not just the evening.

In summary, after experimenting on myself and reading all the research I could find, I don’t see any benefit from abstaining from caffeine. It seems that if you do it right, you can get a net positive effect with almost no drawbacks. So, drink up.

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Anything Worth Doing is Worth Doing Right

It seems that I am always in a rush.

I find it very difficult to just do what I am doing without thinking about what is coming next or when I’ll be finished with whatever I am working on.

rushing Anything Worth Doing is Worth Doing Right

Even as I am sitting and writing this blog post, I’m not really as immersed in the process as I should be. Instead, I am thinking about the fact that I need to get this post done and ready to be published today.

For some reason, I always feel like the clock is ticking down on me. I always feel rushed and that I need to rush things along.

I don’t think I’ve ever sat down and written something that had more than a single rough draft and a final draft. I can’t imagine having multiple drafts of a thing.

Why am I saying this? Because, lately I’ve been meditating on the phrase “anything worth doing is worth doing right.”

Am I really giving it my all?

I’ve been thinking about that phrase a lot and how much I tend to ignore it. I get a lot done, but what I get done isn’t always as satisfying as it should be, because I often find I’m not applying myself as much as I should be.

This “weakness” seems to permeate every area of my life. As I’m running or lifting weights at the gym, I often realize that I’m not giving it my all. As I am writing a blog post, or writing code, I get the same feeling of not giving 100%. When I’m playing with my daughter, or spending time with my family, I’m often not 100% there—but, it’s not like I’m somewhere else either. I’m often just sort of wandering through life a little bit “checked out.”

The best word I can use to describe this is slothfulness. I’ve been feeling this pressing need to eliminate as much slothfulness from my life as possible.

I’m beginning to realize how much time and effort is wasted on doing things in a half-ass manner. If I sit down to do some work and I don’t know exactly what I am doing, if I’m not focused on a specific task I need to get done, I end up wasting a lot of time.

But, it’s actually more than that. I’ve found ways to make sure I am focused on the task at hand in order to make sure that I don’t waste time by taking too long to accomplish a particular task, but what is more difficult is giving 100% to the task at hand. It’s quite possible to be 100% focused, but not to be giving it all you’ve got.

There is a huge penalty in not giving it all you’ve got. This is the real struggle—at least for me—at least right now.

I know the work I am producing could be better. I know the time I’m spending could be more fulfilling, if, I could just fully subscribe to the belief that anything worth doing is worth doing right.

Fixing the problem

The good news is that I have been thinking about some ways to combat this problem. Here are some of my ideas:

First of all, I am going to try and not do anything unless I know what I am going to do and I am going to devote 100% of my focus to that activity.

That doesn’t mean that I have to plan out every aspect of my day ahead of time, but it means that I have to at least plan out what I am going to do before I do it.

For example, today I decided that I was going to go to a coffee shop and get the intro letter for early readers of my book done, write an email that talked about the revisions to the chapters in my book and write this blog post.

I didn’t plan for reading through my email, checking Facebook or doing anything else during that time. I’m sitting here working on exactly what I had planned to work on and I am putting my full focus into that work.

I’ll also plan out when I’ll do certain things so that they aren’t hanging over my head and distracting me from other things I am doing. I find that I can’t focus on the task at hand when I have some uncertainty about another task that I need to get done. Whenever I feel that uncertainty about something that needs to get done, my plan is to schedule it so that I can take it off my mind.

Setting standards

Next up, I’m going to try to have a bit more rigorous standards for what I am doing before I start doing it. I’ve found that it’s often difficult for me to decide what “doing something right” means. It’s pretty subjective and when I feel like I am done with a task, my judgment tends to be skewed. I’m likely to call something done that is “good enough” rather than “right.”

Sometimes the effort to take something from “good enough” to “right” is very small, so it is worth taking the extra time and putting forth the extra effort to go the last mile. I can spend a large amount of time and effort on a task or project and have this gnawing feeling of discontent if I am willing to accept “good enough.” This acceptance of “good enough” often negates the entire reward of the effort, so I want to strive towards doing things right instead of just “good enough,” even if it takes more time.

Stop rushing

That brings me to the next point: stop rushing.

I’m always rushing. Always trying to get things done as fast as possible so that I can be as prolific as possible. While being more prolific might have a higher monetary reward, I’ve found it often comes at the cost of feeling discontent with the work being done.

flowers Anything Worth Doing is Worth Doing Right

This one is going to be one of the most difficult ones for me. Even now, thinking about this very subject, my fingers are still frantically striking the keyboard as I glance at the clock, worried about how long it is taking me to write this post.

I think a solution to this problem may be to block out ample blocks of time to work on a thing. To purposely give myself breathing room. For example, I might feel less rushed if I came here to write a blog post, that I figured would take me about an hour, but I gave myself two hours to work on it instead. And, if I forced myself to spend the entire allotted time working on it, I would probably not feel rushed and I’d would produce an overall better product.

The next task I do, I am going to try and block off time and force myself to use the entire allotted time.

Living in the moment

Let’s see what else is left. How about living in the moment—another extremely difficult one for me now. I have a difficult time stopping to smell the roses. I imagine that if I stop rushing, I’ll probably solve this problem as well, but for now, I am going to try to start purposely giving 100% to what I am doing at any given time.

With every activity I am doing, work or otherwise, I am going to try and focus 100% on what I am doing and also give 100% to that activity. This one will be difficult—I am sure of it. But, this might be the most important thing to focus on. Sometimes I feel like my life is passing me by because I’m always looking forward or backward—I’m never taking time to stop and smell the roses.

One aspect of this that I have been thinking about is to actively think about what I am doing at any given moment and to clearly define it. For example, if I am sitting on the couch, I should ask myself what am I doing. Am I having a conversation with someone? Am I relaxing? Am I doing something else? At any given time I should be able to define what it is I am doing. It doesn’t necessarily have to be something productive. It is better to actively decide that I am spending time browsing Facebook than it is to just be sitting at a computer “doing nothing.”

In fact, I just purchased The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment. Not sure if this book is good or not, but several people have recommended it to me and it came to mind today.

Drop more stuff

Finally, I think I need to drop anything that I am not going to do right. This is the full interpretation of “anything worth doing is worth doing right.” I simply need to make a rule that if I am not willing to do something right, if I am not willing to devote my full energy to it, if I am not willing to slow down and not rush through it, then I simply should not do it at all.

I often have thought that if I stopped splitting my focus so much that I’d be able to be much more successful at the things I do choose to do. This is another difficult one for me, because I tend to see one of my greatest assets as my ability to do so many different things. It’s scary and dangerous to either drop things that I am used to doing or to recommit to them, giving 100% effort.

At a surface level, I know that it would be better to focus on a smaller number of things and to dive deeper into those things, but at a deeper level, I’m scared to do it. I’m the kind of person that likes to leave as many doors open as possible. The thought of closing some doors scares me, but I know I need to do it.

Well, that is about it. I’m trying to use this time in Hawaii, away from my normal schedule to be as introspective as possible. Expect some big changes in the next few months as I start to get everything figured out and set the course for the future.

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You Never Really Learn Something Until You Teach It

As software developers we spend a large amount of time learning. There is always a new framework or technology to learn. It can seem impossible to keep up with everything when there is something new every day. So, it should be no surprise to you that learning quickly and gaining a deeper understanding of what you learn is very important.

And that is exactly why–if you are not doing so already–you need to incorporate teaching into your learning.

Why teaching is such an effective learning tool

When we learn something, most of us learn it in bits and pieces. Typically, if you read a book, you’ll find the material in that book organized in a sensible way. The same goes for others mediums like video or online courses. But, unfortunately, the material doesn’t go into your head in the same way.

teaching You Never Really Learn Something Until You Teach It

What happens instead is that you absorb information in jumbled bits and pieces. You learn something, but don’t completely “get it” until you learn something else later on. The earlier topic becomes more clear, but the way that data is structured in your mind is not very well organized–regardless of how organized the source of that information was.

Even now, as I write this blog post, I am struggling with taking the jumbled mess of information I have in my head about how teaching helps you learn and figuring out how to present it in an organized way. I know what I want to say, but I don’t yet know how to say it. Only the process of putting my thoughts on paper will force me to reorganize them; to sort them out and make sense of them.

When you try to teach something to someone else, you have to go through this process in your own mind. You have to take that mess of data, sort it out, repackage it and organize it in a way that someone else can understand. This process forces you to reorganize the way that data is stored in your own head.

Also, as part of this process, you’ll inevitably find gaps in your own understanding of whatever subject you are trying to teach. When we learn something we have a tendency to gloss over many things we think we understand. You might be able to solve a math problem in a mechanical way, and the steps you use to solve the math problem might be sufficient for what you are trying to do, but just knowing how to solve a problem doesn’t mean you understand how to solve a problem. Knowledge is temporary. It is easily lost. Understanding is much more permanent. It is rare that we forget something we understand thoroughly.

When we are trying to explain something to someone else, we are forced to ask ourselves the most important question in leaning… in gaining true understanding… “why.” When we have to answer the question “why,” superficial understanding won’t do. We have to know something deeply in order to not just say how, but why.

That means we have to explore a subject deeply ourselves. Sometimes this involves just sitting and thinking about it clearly before you try to explain it to someone else. Sometimes just the act of writing, speaking or drawing something causes you to make connections you didn’t make before, instantly deepening your knowledge. (Ever had one of those moments when you explained something to someone else and you suddenly realized that before you tried to explain it you didn’t really understand it yourself, but now you magically do?) And, sometimes, you have to go back to the drawing board and do more research to fill in those gaps in your own knowledge you just uncovered when you tried to explain it to someone else.

Becoming a teacher

So, you perhaps you agree with me so far, but you’ve got one problem–you’re not a teacher. Well, I have good news for you. We are all teachers. Teaching doesn’t have to be some formal thing where you have books and a classroom. Teaching is simply repackaging information in a way that someone else can understand. The most effective teaching takes place when you can explain something to someone in terms of something else they already understand.

 

(Want a great book on the subject that might make your brain hurt? Surfaces and Essences: Analogy as the Fuel and Fire of Thinking. An excellent book by Douglas Hofstadter, author of Godel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid. Both books are extremely difficult reads, but very rewarding.)

becoming a teacher You Never Really Learn Something Until You Teach It

As human beings, we do this all the time. Whenever we communicate with someone else and tell them about something we learned or explain how to do something, we are teaching. Of course, the more you do it, the better you get at it, and adding a little more formalization to your practice doesn’t hurt, but at heart, you–yes, you–are a teacher.

One of the best ways to start teaching–that may even benefit your career–is to start a blog. Many developers I talk to assume that they have to already be experts at something in order to blog about it. The truth is, you only have to be one step ahead of someone for them to learn from you. So, don’t be afraid to blog about what you are learning as you are learning it. There will always be someone out there who could benefit from your knowledge–even if you consider yourself a beginner.

And don’t worry about blogging for someone else–at least not at first. Just blog for yourself. The act of taking your thoughts and putting them into words will gain you the benefits of increasing your own understanding and reorganizing thoughts in your mind.

I won’t pretend the process isn’t painful. When you first start writing, it doesn’t usually come easily. But, don’t worry too much about quality. Worry about communicating your ideas. With time, you’ll eventually get better and you’ll find the process of converting the ideas in your head to words becomes easier and easier.

Of course, creating a blog isn’t the only way to start teaching. You can simply have a conversation with a friend, a coworker, or even your spouse about what you are learning. Just make sure you express what you are learning externally in one form or another if you really want to gain a deep understanding of the subject.

You can also record videos or screencasts, speak on a subject or even give a presentation at work. Whatever you do, make sure that teaching is part of your learning process.

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What to Do When You Don’t Feel Like Writing and You Have Nothing to Say

I spend a lot of time doing two things: blogging and telling other developers the benefits of doing things like starting their own blog. (Occasionally I squeeze in a little bit of time to code as well. And my wife says I spend too much time answering emails and checking my phone—she wanted me to add that to this post.)

So, I can tell you that one of the major pains I am well acquainted with is that of writing when you don’t feel like writing or you just don’t have anything to say.

I experience this frustration myself—heck I am experiencing it right now. I decided to write this blog post because I couldn’t come up with anything else to write about. And, to top it off, I don’t feel like writing either.

tired thumb What to Do When You Dont Feel Like Writing and You Have Nothing to Say

But, let me jump ahead and give you a little secret: by the time I’m halfway through this post, not only will I know what to write about, but I will feel like writing.

I know this from experience, and it is part of what keeps me going on days like these.

Writing is difficult

Writing isn’t an easy thing to do.

It is hard to spill your brains onto a blank piece of paper and not make it look like spaghetti.

It’s difficult to constantly come up with new ideas, week after week.

But, by far, the hardest part of writing is just sitting down in front of the keyboard and typing. Even now, as I am typing these very words, a million other things are vying for my attention, calling me away from the task at hand.

Most software developers who start a blog, end up abandoning that blog, because they never learned how to grit their teeth, glue their ass to a seat and write.

Sure, it starts out fun. When you first throw up your blog on the internet, you are full of ideas. You could write a blog post each and every day—not because you are more creative when you first start, but because you are more motivated. The whole process is still very new and enjoyable.

But, fast forward a couple of months—or a couple of weeks for those of us with ADHD—and that shiny-newness of blogging wears off. That little fairy that was sitting on you shoulder telling you what to write is gone—it’s just you and the keyboard.

This is exactly when you have to search deep down inside of yourself and find the grit beneath your soft cushy exterior. You have to decide—that’s right, make a decision—that every week you are going to write a blog post and nothing is going to stop you from doing it.

You’ll want to start over and give up

Even as I write this very sentence, I want to go back to the beginning of my post and delete everything. It’s no good. My thoughts are scattered; my analogies are crap; no one cares about what I have to say on this subject.paper thumb What to Do When You Dont Feel Like Writing and You Have Nothing to Say

I’ve been writing blog posts just about every single week for over 4 years, and I am still smacked in the face with the stick of doubt just about every time I sit down to write. So, I can tell you from experience, that part doesn’t get any easier.

But, you can’t let that stop you. Your face might be swollen, some of your teeth might be missing, you might have to squint to see out of one of your eyes, but as soon as you care that what you are writing is no good, you’ll stop writing—permanently. You’ll fall right off the wagon.

By the time you’ve gotten this far into my own essay, it doesn’t matter if it is good. I’ve got your attention already. I can’t embarrass myself any further, because if you didn’t at least sort-of like what I have said so far, you wouldn’t be reading this sentence to begin with.

I’ve come to the realization that you can’t always hit homeruns. Sometimes, you write crap. Sometimes, what you think is your best blog post turns out to be so terrible that no one makes it past the first paragraph.

But, sometimes what you think is terrible, turns out to be the most popular thing you’ve ever written.

The point is, you can’t know until you hit that publish button and even if you could, it doesn’t matter, because you can’t write for other people, you’ve got to write for you.

Not because you are writing something that you’ll someday read later and say “oh, yes, that is how I solved that problem in the past”—although, that does happen from time to time. Instead, you have to write because you made a commitment to yourself and the commitment wasn’t to string marvelous words into sentence on paper, but instead just to write—it doesn’t have to be any good.

The secret is to keep going

I’m sure you’ve noticed by now that I haven’t really told you what to do when you don’t feel like writing and you have nothing to say, so, here it is: write.

Yep, that’s it. It’s that simple.

Take some duct tape, put it over your mouth, shut up, stop whining, pull up a chair, sit down at the keyboard and start moving your fingers.

You can’t sit there and type and have nothing to say. Now, what you have to say, you might think isn’t any good—and it may be utter crap—but there is no reason that has to stop you from writing. Just do it.

There are a million ideas bouncing in your head, but some of those ideas will only come to the surface when you have decided you are going to sit down and do the work.

Don’t believe me?

Try this exercise on. Right now I want you to close your eyes, and think about nothing. That’s right, think about absolutely nothing—I’ll wait.

How’d that go for you? Were you able to think about nothing?

So, don’t tell me you don’t have something to write about. Of course you do. Your problem—and my problem—isn’t writing, it’s typing it out.

P.S. – By the time this post goes live, I’ll be in the middle of launching my How To Market Yourself as a Software Developer program. If you liked this post, go check out the program. It has a whole video course on creating your own developer blog and making it successful.

My Secret To Ridiculous Productivity. (I’m Using It Now)

In the last year, I:

I’m not saying this to brag–although I am certainly proud of these accomplishments. I am saying these things to prove that I know what I am talking about when it comes to productivity.

Being super productive

Right now–as I type–I have a timer ticking down. The clock shows approximately 14 minutes before I’ll take my next break. I live and die by this clock.

Live and die by clock thumb My Secret To Ridiculous Productivity. (Im Using It Now)

You may have guessed it, but the clock is a Pomodoro timer. For the last year, I’ve been religiously using the Pomodoro technique to not only stay on task, but to plan out my days and weeks.

If you aren’t familiar with the Pomodoro technique, the concept is remarkably simple. So simple, that I first dismissed it as ridiculous. But, thanks to my good friend Josh Earl’s success with it, I decided to give it another try.

You basically set a timer for 25 minutes. During that time you pick a single task to accomplish and work on that task, uninterrupted. After 25 minutes you take a break for 5 minutes and then begin again. After 4 cycles, you take a longer 15 minute break. (There are some variations on this, but that is the basic idea.)

Like I said, it seems pretty simple and unremarkable, but I can’t even begin to express how powerful this technique is for getting things done.

I’m lazy by nature. I have to constantly fight against the side of me that wants to procrastinate and slough off my work. The Pomodoro technique helps keep me focused by forcing me to work uninterrupted for a period of time. It also gives me a measure to compare myself against and realistic targets to aspire to achieve.

My week

My week beings on Monday. On Monday morning I wake up and go to the gym to lift weights. When I get back, I have a protein shake and get to work.

The first thing I do when I get to my desk on Monday is start my Pomodoro timer and open up my “Weekly Plan” Trello board. I use this board to organize my week. It has nine columns. Seven columns for the days of the week, one column for today, and one column for done.

2014 02 13 21 18 01 thumb My Secret To Ridiculous Productivity. (Im Using It Now)

My first task of the day is to create the rest of the tasks that I think I can get done that week. I start off with a checklist of things that I know I need to do every week:

  • Blog post
  • Podcast episode
  • YouTube video
  • Newsletter email
  • Buffer social network posts

Then, I add cards for the current projects I am working on for that week.

Once I’ve got all the cards I can think of on the board, I start tagging each card with a color that represents how many Pomodoros I think that task will take. I have three categories:

  • Green: 1 Pomodoro
  • Yellow: 2 Pomodoros
  • Orange: 3 Pomodoros

2014 02 13 21 18 31 thumb My Secret To Ridiculous Productivity. (Im Using It Now)

If something is going to take up more than three Pomodoros worth of time, it needs to be split into multiple tasks.

Next up is planning the week. For each day of the week–unless there is something that will take up most of my time–I figure I can get about 10 Pomodoros done.  This may not seem like a lot, but believe me, it is. I drag cards into the columns until I have filled up each weekday with 10 Pomodoros worth of cards. For weekends, I usually just drag in about three or four.

My estimates are always on the high side, but they are pretty accurate, because it is fairly easy to estimate based on half hour intervals–especially when many of your tasks are repeated each week. (For example, a blog post is estimated at three Pomodoros.)

My day

I have a similar ritual every single day. The first thing I do, after exercising each day, is to open up my Trello board again and this time plan the day.

New things come up and other things need to get shifted around, so planning for the week alone is not sufficient. Often, I’ll have different tasks that I had vaguely identified at the beginning of the week which I’ll give more clarity to later on.

I first drag things over from the appropriate day into my “Today” column until that column is filled with about 10 Pomodoros worth of work. After that, I’ll take a look at the today columns and think about anything I might have missed that needs to get done that day. Finally, I’ll sort the “Today” column based on priority–I want to make sure I am always working on the most important things first.

Once I’ve got the day sorted out, I go back to the rest of the days in the week and move around cards until everything is balanced again. If I find that I’ve got some empty slots, I’ll create new cards and start filling those slots until I am back at full capacity again.

Once all the prep-work is done, it’s time to actually start working on tasks. I grab the first task off the list, start a timer and get to work. At about 5:00, I stop for the day and add up my Pomodoros. If I didn’t hit at least 10, I count on working a little bit that evening. If I did hit 10, it’s optional.

Why this works

So, you may be wondering why this works–why it is worth even writing about such a simple workflow. Well, even though this workflow seems really simple, there are a few key things going on here that aren’t immediately obvious.

First of all, I am using quotas to make sure that I accomplish the volume of work that I want to produce each week. I have quotas for how many blog posts, podcasts, YouTube videos, and other content that I need to produce each week. The things that are being measured by a quota get dropped onto my board first.

I’m also using a daily and weekly quota when it comes to Pomodoros. Pomodoros are little measurable units of work for me. I know that I should be able to get 10 done each day and that I should be able to get roughly 50 done in a week without killing myself. I know from experience that hitting 60-70 will cause a measurable dip in performance the next week and that if I am doing less than 50, I am slacking off.

Because I have those quotas in place, I know what is expected of me each and every week. I have the power to hold myself accountable to a real measurable standard. I can’t emphasize enough how important this point is. If you don’t have a way to hold yourself accountable to a standard that you want to achieve, human nature will cause you to fall way below the bar.

Another major component that makes this technique successful is the awareness of my capacity within a given amount of time. It is really easy to over or under estimate what you can get done in week, because you don’t normally have a ruler that you can use to measure task duration versus your actual capacity. When I start the week, I know that my capacity is about 50–I’ve got that much gas in my car. I get to choose where I want to drive that car that week–I can only go so far. I have to make a realistic prediction of what I can actually get done. From that prediction I have to prioritize my tasks so that the most important things get done first.

Capacity thumb My Secret To Ridiculous Productivity. (Im Using It Now)

Without this understanding of my capacity, it is easy to fall into the trap of overestimating my ability to get work done and underestimating the take it will take to get the work done. With this system, I have a real metric to compare to. I know that I am not going to get 80 Pomodoros done in a week. I know that in an 8 hour day, I will not get 8 hours of work done. I am eliminating my biases by replacing them with real statistics.

Finally, the dedicated focus of the Pomodoro technique makes me more efficient at the work I am doing. When I am solely focused on one task at a time–without checking Facebook or Twitter–I work much more efficiently. Several studies have shown that multitasking causes a drop in efficiency. When I stay focused on a single task, I get much more done. I’ve written about this before, when I talked about quitting your job, but you can easily lose hours of time in a day to small distractions. Over the period of a year’s worth of time, all those wasted minutes can end up equaling weeks of lost productivity.

The benefits

One huge benefit of this technique is that I am able to do most of this work without stress or guilt. Normally, when I am working, I always feel guilty about how much time I am wasting during the day. I also feel stressed about not getting as much done as I should be getting done. This situation of stress and guilt actually ends up being the perfect breeding ground for procrastination and burnout.

When I am using the Pomodoro technique, I don’t feel the guilt of wasting time, because I know that as long as I get done 10 Pomodoros in a day I have reached my productivity goal for the day. If I get more done, great.

I also don’t feel stressed about getting as much done as I should have, because how much I get done is no longer what is being measured–I’ve taken the burden off of my shoulders. My focus has shifted from results to process. I can’t control the results. Work takes as long as work takes. But, I can control the process. If I put in my 10 Pomodoros for the day and I have sufficiently prioritized my work, then I have done the best that I can do–no need for guilt, shame or stress.

Time for a break

If you are interested in getting started with the Pomodoro technique, I’d recommend checking out Pomodoro Technique Illustrated. And if you have any questions about my process and how it works, feel free to ask and I am happy to answer them in the comments below.

Also, if you liked this post and are interested in more of what I have to say about being productive and boosting your career, sign up for my weekly newsletter here. You also might want to check out the course I am putting together called “How To Market Yourself as a Software Developer.”

How You Are Wasting Your Time

I write quite often on this blog about starting a side business or becoming self-employed, but one of the biggest struggles in getting something new started is finding time.

The same goes for getting fit and getting in shape.

So, if you want to be successful in your career, or in life in general, it is really beneficial to find out where you are wasting your time—so you can stop wasting your time.

I’ve found there is one major time-waster out there that many of us indulge in.  One that can easily be cut out, or at least reduced significantly, to give you back much of that time you are wasting each day.

I’m not going to give away the answer here, but you can probably guess what it is already.

Check out my video for this week below and let me know what you think.

The Importance of Having a Routine

In this video I talk about how important it is to build a routine for yourself.

I’ve found that having a routine, while boring at times, is really important for long term success.  I used this technique to get 30 Pluralsight courses created this year alone and 54 overall.

Watch the video to find out why I think having a routine is so important.

The Power Of Batching

There are many things we do that require a large amount of setup before we can actually produce something. For example, these YouTube videos require quite a bit of setup to record. Often, we can increase our productivity in these cases, by learning to produce things in batches.
In this video, I’ll tell you why you might want to consider using batching to help you be more productive and I’ll tell you how I use batching to even make these videos.

So You Want To Quit Your Job (How To Do It)

This is the 3rd post in a three part series about quitting your job and working for yourself. Check out the first post about why you should want to quit your job, and the second post about the fantasies and realities of quitting your job.

I want to start off by saying that I, myself, have had several false starts and I’ve witnessed countless others who think that they are going to quit their job and live their dream only to wash up, shipwrecked on the shores of reality.

I’ve already talked about the harsh realities of working for yourself. If that part didn’t scare you at least a little bit, or you think that what I said doesn’t apply to you, there isn’t much point reading any further, because this advice won’t help you either.

But, if what I said earlier made you sweat just a little bit; made you just a little bit more unsure of your brilliant plan, then you’ll probably find the advice I offer here immensely useful (I wish I would have had this, advice when I started out.)

Transition into working for yourself

Too many people, myself included at earlier points in my career, want to just make a big leap from working for someone else to working for themselves.leap thumb So You Want To Quit Your Job (How To Do It)

Now, for some people this ends up working out. These are the people you hear of that quit their job to follow their dream and then they created some startup company that got purchased for millions of dollars. Some people also win the lottery and others, unfortunately, get hit by lightning.

But, what you don’t hear about is all the people who quit their jobs to follow their dreams and end up wasting a year or two of their life eating up all the savings they have accumulated from the past 10 years while they suffer from a bout of writer’s block that never ends up being cured.

The truth is, working for the man is quite a bit like slavery or prison. You can’t just be set free and expect that you’ll adapt comfortably to your new life and start fulfilling your dreams. It is a bit like when you get off that 6 week diet you were on and say “ok, I’m just going to pig out a little as a reward, then I’ll get back to ‘normal eating.'” What ends up happening is this instant transformation from the shackles of a restrictive diet to “free eater” doesn’t land us in the comfortable norm of “normal healthy eater” like we’d expect. Nope, instead we take a 1 way ticket to pig-out land until we eventually come crawling back to the comfortable diet prison that we hated, yet required.

The same happens to software developers, and other professionals who go from working for the man to being the man– they can’t handle it! They go nuts, and waste lots of time being unproductive without the structure of a workplace and someone cracking the whip on their back. Eventually, they crawl back to their cruel masters and begrudgingly reenter the rat race.

The problem is that working for yourself requires self-discipline. More than you’ve got right now. Yes, I know that your parents and friends have commented on how self-disciplined you are because you have excelled at your job by actually showing up to work each day and doing your job, but there is a huge difference between doing what you are supposed to do because you are supposed to do it and doing what you are supposed to do, because there are immediate and dire consequences if you don’t.

Stop shaking your head for a moment and listen to me. I know you think you are better than that, but you aren’t. Take a deep breath, dig deep and realize what I am saying is true. If you really want to succeed on your own, you are going to have to learn this skill as well; seeing an unfiltered view of reality.

The demons

In order to be ready to be successful on your own, without a boss, without a formalized structure and system of consequences, you are going to have to exorcise a few demons.

demons thumb So You Want To Quit Your Job (How To Do It)

The best place to perform this religious rite is at your current workplace, in your current job. You will use this as a transition period and training ground to prove yourself, before you cut loose your chains.

The first demon: productivity

In my last post, I talked about the fantasy and reality of working for yourself and really what it focused on was the most critical component: productivity.

These days, productivity is like a drug; lots of people are peddling productivity hacks and productivity tools as if productivity means more than just working hard on what you are supposed to.

The trick is that it is much easier said than done. As I highlighted in the last post, most of us are spending very little time actually working productively at work. And, you will probably be in for quite a shock when you lose your shackles and find out that you aren’t getting nearly as much done as you thought you were– oh, and now you aren’t getting paid for goofing off.

So, my advice is: before you quit your job, you need to actually be able to put in a 6 hour day of hard work. No better place to practice doing that than in a paid learning environment.

How do we get there?

It isn’t going to be easy. But, nothing ever is, right?

I use a productivity technique called the Pomodoro technique to both measure and help me achieve a high level of productivity. The idea behind this technique is pretty simple. So simple that I actually overlooked it the first time I had been introduced to it and only later came back to it when a friend of mine, Josh Earl, mentioned how much success he was having using it.

The idea is that you set a timer for 25 minutes. During this time, you work on one focused task without interruption. After you are done, you take a 5 minute break and repeat. Nothing magic here. The magic is actually in the measurement. You see how many of these you can get done in a day and you track them. You can actually then plan out your work and estimate your work in terms of Pomodoros, which it turns outs, is extremely useful.

I’d recommend getting this book, Pomodoro Technique Illustrated (Pragmatic Life), to learn more about this deceptively simple seeming productivity tool.

2013 10 24 23 26 09 So You Want To Quit Your Job (How To Do It)

I’d recommend starting to put this into practice at your regular job. Try to achieve 8 Pomodoros a day. This would represent close to 6 hours of productivity. And only count time that you are actually being productive. This means producing something of tangible value. You are going to end up not replying back to lots of emails and dismissing yourself from a bunch of meetings.

The second demon: gold-plating

On someone else’s dime it is pretty easy to forgo pragmatism. But, something I had to learn really quickly when I struck out on my own is that good enough really is good enough.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not saying do shoddy work. And you already know that I’m not advocating not working so hard. What I am saying is, if you want to be super productive, you can’t make every piece of work you do a masterpiece. You have to find the right balance of time and effort.

Take this blog post, for example. I’m putting quite a bit of work into this post and the series of blog posts it belongs to, but I could actually spend weeks or months writing and rewriting parts of this post. If I did this, I might end up with a true work of art at the end of the process, but I’m not going to do that. Instead, I’m going to ship it when it gets to the 80-90% effectiveness mark and not worry about squeezing out that extra 10% of quality for another 300% cost of time and effort.

Don’t take this as an excuse to do s!*# work and ship a bunch of crap. That is easy, anyone can do that. Instead focus on being pragmatic. Get to the point where the work is good enough and let it go, then move onto the next thing. This is much harder than you might think– it is a delicate balance.

The third demon: consistency

Success is usually not the result of a glorious fight with a single dragon which you vanquish in a fierce battle, instead the road to success looks much more like running around Midgaard naked, killing rats over and over again.  So You Want To Quit Your Job (How To Do It) So You Want To Quit Your Job (How To Do It)

Working hard and being pragmatic is completely worthless if you can’t do these things consistently week after week month after month. It is like starving yourself for a day and thinking you are going to lose weight, or running a marathon and sitting on the couch for the rest of the year.

So, how do you learn consistency? Simple, you cut out all the excuses. Make being consistent a matter of life and death. Don’t act like failure is an option. Pretend like just missing a single day or skipping a beat is the end of the world.

Eventually, you’ll be able to use your judgment to decide what you should do and when to make exceptions, but for now make rules for yourself. Rules that you will not break under any circumstances. Learning to live by rules like this will be a huge benefit to you. Everyone is weak-willed, no one can resist temptation; if you want to be successful, avoid judgment calls and decision making. Make your decisions ahead of time and codify them as rules that you follow every day.

I’ll give you an example, before I wrap up this post, because it is already getting quite long. Right now I am learning Spanish. I am using an app on my iPad called Doulingo to do this. I have a rule that I do this app at least 30 minutes a day, every day– no excuses. What do you think will happen if I obey this rule every single day for a year? I think I am going to be pretty good at Spanish. Unless I stick my finger in an electrical socket and fry my brains, it will be pretty hard for me not to succeed, so long as I follow my rule.

The hard part

If I haven’t lost you yet, you must really be serious. Good. You are going to need to be serious to stomach what I am going to tell you next.

At this point, if you start right now, you are probably still at least two years out from the point where you are going to be able to quit your job and not end up coming crawling back to the rat race battered and beaten.

I see far too many people come up with the ill-conceived plan of saving up perhaps 6 months to a year’s worth of living expenses and then quitting their job to pursue their dreams of starting their own business. (I’ve entertained this idea myself several times in my career.)

But, let me tell you why this is a very bad idea and then give you a much better one– a plan that will actually work and isn’t likely to leave you homeless or broke.

The reason why saving up a bunch of money and quitting is a bad idea is, because if you do this, you will be constantly racing against time. Instead of time working for you, you will have time working against you. You’ll make bad choices, you’ll feel panicked, you will not be operating under ideal conditions and you won’t be giving yourself room to fail– which you will inevitably do.

Here is a better plan. Instead, of thinking in terms of saving up X amount of dollars, think in terms of earning X amount of monthly income from a side business. Whatever business you plan on creating once you quit your job, start doing it now. Start building you future business while you are still working for the man. If you can’t get something going on the side without the stress and pressure of potential financial ruin, you aren’t going to succeed when you go it alone and add all the extra pressure and stress that comes with being self-employed and not getting a pay check.

Sure, it will take you longer. Sure, it is going to be hard to essentially work two jobs, but the question is, how bad do you want it? If you don’t want it that bad, fine, I’m not going to try and convince you otherwise– to each his own. But, if you really want it, and you are willing to both work and wait for it, then do it the smart way; build your business on the side while you are still getting a regular paycheck.

Parting words

Well, I hope this series was helpful to you. I’m not an expert by any means on the subject, but I can speak from personal experience, and I’ve talked with enough other people who have made the transition to know that what I am telling you here is not my advice alone.

When I first quit my job, I was shocked at how different life was from how I had imagined it would be. I had to make some big adjustments really fast, because I wasn’t prepared. Hopefully, after this advice, you won’t find yourself in the same situation, or at least you’ll have a rough idea of what to expect and how to deal with it.

So, You Want To Quit Your Job? (Fantasy Versus Reality)

This is part two in a series about quitting your job.  Check out the first post here.

Imagine you are going for a run in your neighborhood; just a casual jog. You are running along comfortably, not really straining that much or breathing heavy, but making good progress. Now imagine that all of the sudden a tiger jumps out of the bushes and starts chasing you.

What do you do?

You probably run quite a bit faster with much more purpose, because you are scared for your life. This is kind what is it like when you quit your job to work for yourself.tiger chasing thumb So, You Want To Quit Your Job? (Fantasy Versus Reality)

For the longest time I had this fantasy of quitting my job and working for myself. Well, actually my real fantasy was playing video games all day and not having to work at all, but even fantasies need to have some basis in reality, so I modified it to be a little more reasonable.

Anyway, I always wanted to be my own boss; to work for myself. I thought that life would be so much better if I had more control over my life; if I could come and go as I pleased and set my own work hours.

Now that I’ve actually done it, I’ve found that working for yourself is not exactly as I had imagined it… let me explain.

The 8 hour fantasy

One of the main things I thought about when I had dreams of working for myself was just how much I could accomplish if I had 8 full hours in a day to work on goals and projects that I set for myself.

For a couple of years my life was pretty miserable. I would work 8 hours during the day for my employer and then when I was done doing my first job I would take a little break to eat dinner and spend some time with my daughter and then back to work for another 4 hours doing Pluralsight courses at night. Weekends usually involved at least another 4 or so hours of doing Pluralsight courses and perhaps another 3-4 to create a blog post each week.

I kept thinking to myself that if I could work full time on the Pluralsight courses I would get an additional 4 hours a day and not even have to work nights. I should be able to get twice as much done and work far fewer hours during the week.

I ran some calculations to see if the payment for creating Pluralsight courses would cover the income I made from my regular job if I produced twice as much content. The numbers seemed to say I would come out pretty far ahead, so as far as I was concerned “quitting my day job” was a no brainer.

The 8 hour reality

My first week of working for myself turned out to not be the fun lighthearted adventure I had set out on.

When the end of the first week had come, instead of completing 4 to 5 modules of a Pluralsight course, like I had anticipated, I had actually only barely completed 3, and that was with me putting in the same 12 hour days that I had put in before quitting my job.

Something was wrong; something was seriously wrong. Working a full time job I was completing 2 modules a week, so if I had 40 extra hours in the week, shouldn’t I have been able to easily get done another 2 more, perhaps even 3 more?

I shook it off as just a fluke. The particular course I was working on required a large amount of research and prep-work as well as scripting out paragraphs of text for each slide—it must have just been bad timing.

The next week I fared a little better, but still not anywhere close to what I had anticipated. I got 4 modules done but it still required around 12 hours of work each day during the week and some on the weekend; the math just didn’t add up.

Here I was busting my butt for only slightly improved results over what I was getting before.

There is work and then there is work

I bet you are probably wondering what exactly happened at this point. What can explain the results I was seeing?

Well, it turns out there is a difference between a job and “work.”time card thumb So, You Want To Quit Your Job? (Fantasy Versus Reality)

You see, at a job you get paid just for showing up. Now I don’t mean to say that you can just sit at your desk and do nothing all day, but in reality you can just sit at your desk and practically do nothing most days at most jobs.

Again, I don’t want to make it seem like I wasn’t working hard for my employers. As an employee, I have always worked hard and done a good job, usually performing well beyond the level that I was expected to perform at. But regardless for how hard I ever worked at any job, I never worked so hard as when I started working for myself.

The reality of the situation is that even the hardest desk worker I know who is working for someone else usually only actually works less than 4 real hours in an 8 hour day. I would actually venture to guess that actual hard nose-to-the-grindstone hours would probably average about 2 per day.

Now, before you get all upset about what I am saying, let’s take a moment to think about why this is.

There are a number of reasons why employees work much fewer hours than the hours they are on the clock. The first, most obvious reason is because they are getting paid by the hour and not the job. When you are getting paid by the hour you have no real motivation to be fast or efficient or to make sure you are working every minute of every hour.

This means that a task that would perhaps take you an hour to do if you were working as diligently and as hard as possible, might take you 2 to 3 hours if you are working, but just not working hard at the task.

Think about the difference between jogging down the street and running for your life because a man-eating lion is chasing you. It isn’t like you are being lazy when you are jogging down the street, it is just that you aren’t in any real rush.

Another major source of distraction is office conversations. In most work environments, people socialize. It is not unreasonable to assume that 2 hours of each day, on average, is eaten up by socializing about non-work related topics or remotely work related topics.

Let’s take another slice out of that 8 hour pie and account for general job overhead. This would be things like checking your work email, reading bulletins and memos, attending pointless meetings, etc. I’ll be absolutely ridiculous and assume this kind of thing only takes up an hour of time a day on average, (although we really know that it probably takes up much more.)

Finally, we get to just plain laziness and doing personal stuff on company time. Life is life and things happen. Your kid gets called into the principal’s office and you get a call at work about it that you have to deal with. You are buying and house and need to fax those loan documents to your mortgage broker. Sometimes you get to work and you just feel burnt out and tired and can’t really manage to do much other than pretend to code while you scroll repeatedly through lines of code waiting for the clock to tick 5:00.

I’ll be nice again and attribute this to only taking up an average an hour a day, but based on my Facebook and Twitter streams, I am pretty sure we all know that number is greater than even the most candid of us will be willing to admit.

So let’s go ahead and do the math. Take your 8 hours and subtract away 2 hours for socialization. That leaves you with 6 hours. Take away 1 for work related overhead and another 1 for life related overhead and laziness and you are already at 4 hours right there. Now take the 4 hours of work that could be done at a running pace and reduce it to a jogging pace, and you are effectively cutting it in half to about 2 hours of actual real work. If you come in late or leave early or you are more social or more lazy or you have more meetings than average, the number could even be further reduced. Some of you might be coming up with negative numbers. It is a wonder anyone gets any work done at all!

So, where did my hours go?

Just because you switch from working for someone else to working for yourself doesn’t mean that you immediately go from getting 2 hours of work done a day to a full 8. Some of the office distractions are eliminated by working for yourself, but others are not.

Most importantly though, there is a big difference and adjustment from being used to working 2 actual hours of real hard work to working 6 to 8 hours of real hard work.

It is sort of like going for a 3 mile jog every day for a couple of years than suddenly one day deciding to start running 12 miles instead. You might be able to do it, but you are going to feel like total crap until you adjust.

It turns out for me that my old routine, before I quit, was working my regular job during the day, which wasn’t all that taxing on me, then working 4 hours each night, at which time I would accomplish perhaps 3 hours of real hard work.

Each day I was perhaps doing 5 hours of real hard work.

When I started working for myself, I found that I was actually doing about 5 hours of real hard work during the day and by the time the night came, I would work perhaps 4 hours, but was so exhausted that I was only getting about 1 hour of real hard work done.

So overall, I was only adding about an hour or two of actual real work worth of progress each day. This lines up about perfectly with the results I was seeing. I was still having to work the same number of hours and I was just getting marginal improvements in my results.

Tracking my time

I’ll put things as civilly as possible here, but to say the least, this was royally pissing me off.

I mean, I was not happy at all with this revelation I was discovering.

I thought long and hard about different jobs I had and what I did during the day at work. I tried to count up the hours and determine if it was really true that I was only spending a couple of hours of real hard work, on average, a day at any given job. Then, I thought about how at most jobs I was getting a lot more work done than most developers were and it made me even more sad.

I decided to start tracking every minute of every day I spent doing work on my Pluralsight courses and whatever else I was working on during the day in order to see where my time went.

My results after several weeks confirmed what I had already known. In any given day, I was lucky to get 5 hours of solid work done during the daytime and 6-7 hours overall in the entire day was about the average.

I was also busting my butt harder than I had ever before.

Summing it up

So, what am I trying to say here? What can you learn from my experience?

Well, first of all, working for yourself is much harder than you might imagine. When you are working for yourself, you are only getting paid if you are working. You don’t just show up and get paid.

You may think you are busting your butt at your job now, and you may very well be, but I can almost guarantee you that you are not working nearly as hard as you would if you were working for yourself. There is a huge difference between doing 2 hours of hard work per day and 6 hours or more of real hard work per day. If you aren’t ready for this change of pace, you can easily be crushed and discouraged by it.

You might just think that this doesn’t apply to you; that you can just sit down at 9:00 AM, plug in your headphones and work hard until 5:00 PM when you disconnect and smile happily at your 8 hours of good old hard work you put in that day.

But, if you are of this mindset, I’d encourage you to do two things before quitting your day job. First, take a week off and try it out. During that week track your time and see how much work you actually get done. Only count work that results in you creating something you get paid for. Don’t count all the overhead and checking emails, etc.

Second, after you see how dismal your results are, get a copy of “The War of Art” and learn that you are not alone. We all struggle with the same problem of being lazy creatures who want to do what is pleasurable instead of being productive and habitually rationalize all our actions until we are reduced into believing that the course of action we are taking is the only possible and reasonable choice.

I’m not saying don’t quit your job. In fact, I encourage you to find a way to build your own business and work for yourself. But, just realize that if you don’t like the idea of working hard every single day you probably won’t like working for yourself very much.